The choice of using an object versus a bed is entirely up to the mixer however there are a few things to keep in mind:


• Objects have no access natively to the Low-Frequency Effects channel. In most circumstances, this is not
a consideration, as the content that exists in the LFE channel should also exist in the main mix. (That is,
do not rely on the LFE to be the “bass channel.”)


• Bed channels map differently to different overhead speaker configurations. Overheads in an x.y.4
configuration will create a phantom center of the x.y.2 component, whereas in an x.y.6 overhead
configuration, it will use the point source speakers. If you have a concern about a source in the overhead
beds, try switching it to an object so you can have more control over how it renders.


• Depending upon the position and size metadata applied to an object, objects and bed channels can be
sonically identical. For instance, an object placed in the left front with size set to zero will be identical to
placing the audio in the Left channel bed.


• A Dolby Atmos input bed can be 2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 5.1, 7.0, 7.1, 7.0.2, or 7.1.2. Distribution of the bed in the
Renderer is defined by the number of speakers in a particular room. For example, if a room is configured
with no center speaker for playback purposes, 3.0 and greater bed configurations will try to phantom
image the content in the bed Center channel to the available left and right positions. This is further
accentuated in the overhead domain. Overheads in a x.y.4 configuration will create a phantom center
(front/back center) of the x.y.2 component, whereas in an x.y.6 overhead configuration, it will use the

 point source speakers. If you have a concern about a source in the overhead beds, try switching it to an

object so you can have more control over how it renders.